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Things to do in Mumbai

Tourist Attractions in Mumbai

Attractions

Overview

Mumbai is the capital city of the Indian state of Maharashtra. Mumbai lies on the Konkan coast on the west coast of India and has a deep natural harbour. In 2008, Mumbai was named an alpha world city. Mumbai is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the Elephanta Caves, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus, and the city’s distinctive ensemble of Victorian and Art Deco buildings.
Mumbai a cosmopolitan metropolis, earlier known as Bombay, is the largest city in India and the capital of Maharashtra state. Mumbai was originally a conglomeration of seven islands on the Konkan coastline which over time were joined to form the island city of Bombay. The island was in turn joined with the neighboring island of Salsette to form Greater Bombay. The city has an estimated metropolitan population of 21 million (2005), making it one of the world’s most populous cities.

Place to Visit

Places to Visit:

  • Colonial buildingsThe British built a magnificent city within the walls of Fort St. George, which lies at the southern extremity of the city. Some fine examples of the Gothic revival, Neo-classical style and Indo-Saracenic style are seen within this area. To get the best [South Mumbai] experience, stroll around the wide streets of the area right from Churchgate to Colaba. These areas are all beautifully planned and have wide and clean pavements unlike the rest of the city. Famous monuments to be seen in this area are the Gateway of India, the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (Victoria Terminus) building, the Municipal Corporation and Police Headquarters and the Chhatrapati Shivaji Vastu Sanghralaya (formerly, the Prince Of Wales museum). The famous Taj Mahal hotel is located just opposite the Gateway of India. The Mumbai University buildings and the High Court are also excellent examples of colonial architecture in the city.The Art Deco buildings on Marine Drive, together with those on the blocks along the nearby park Oval Maidan, were recognized in 2018 by UNESCO as part of World Heritage site, a distinction that is expected to help preserve and promote the neighborhood. The city, reportedly has the world’s second-largest collection of Art-Deco buildings, second only to Miami, Florida, USA.</p
  • Museums and galleriesSome of the most famous museums and art galleries in India are found here. The Kala Ghoda area in South Mumbai teems with them, particularly the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (Prince of Wales Museum) [41], and the National Gallery of Modern Art [42]. Once again, most of them are concentrated in South Mumbai. Also worth planning a visit is Jehangir Art Gallery, also at Kala Ghoda, displays changing exhibits by notable artists. The plaza next to the gallery also regularly displays exhibits of various artists.Situated in Nehru Complex in Worli is Nehru Centre Art Gallery at Worli, a gallery dedicated to young and promising talent along with established artists. Also within the complex is located a permanent exposition, Discovery of India, which attempts to cover every aspect of artistic, intellectual and philosophical attainment of India through ages. The exposition spreads across 14 galleries and reflects true identity of the country. On the other end of the complex, Nehru Science Centre – which has a separate entrance from Mahalaxmi race course road, has a permanent exhibition on ‘interactive and exciting’ science related exhibits highlighting science principles in fun yet educational way.
  • BeachesMumbai has a few beaches, including one in the downtown area. But they aren’t that great and the water off Mumbai’s coast is extraordinarily dirty. The relatively better ones are in the Northwest Mumbai area. However, they are a great place to see how the locals spend their Sunday evenings, with various food and game stalls.There are other beaches to be found such as the Girgaon Chowpaty in South Mumbai, Juhu beach in the western suburbs and Aksa Beach in Malad. The currents don’t seem strong, but particularly in the rains, lots of people die from drowning, so avoid getting in the water (especially at Aksa Beach). A word of advice to women: Bombay beaches are not the kind you can wear swimsuits to, particularly two-pieces.
  • Zoos, parks and gardensMumbai has a justified reputation as a concrete jungle, but there are some nice pockets of greenery within the city. It is also one of the rare metropolises to have an entire national park within its borders. (Borivali national park also known as Sanjay Gandhi National Park). You will not visit Mumbai for them, but if you are already here, they make a nice escape from the din and bustle. It also houses the ancient Kanheri Caves crafted out of rocky cliffs, which dates back to 2,400 years. Entrance fee: Indians/Foreigns 30/30Besides, at Andheri in the North there is a nice little Bhavans Nature Adventure Centre offering nature trails, animal care sessions and adventure activities, interesting for children and youngsters; 5 minute walk from Azadnagar metro station and 15 minute walk from Andheri station
    The city zoo (Veermata Jijabai Udyan) is in Byculla and is a colonial relic which is surprisingly well-preserved. The animals may look rather emaciated, but the sheer diversity of trees on this lush zoo is worth a trip.
  • Some city parks are very well-maintained and combine history as well. The “Hanging Gardens” on Malabar Hill offers stunning vistas of the Marine Drive. Opposite the Hanging Gardens, there is another park which is known as Kamla Nehru Park, famous for the striking shoe-shaped structure which has been filmed in various Bollywood movies
  • Further in South Mumbai, the Mumbai Port Trust Garden, is another hidden gem. This is set off a small side street off the Colaba Causeway 2-3 kms south of the main section. Once again, lovely views of the port, the naval yards, and sunset.
    In central Mumbai, there are the Five Gardens. Mainly used by walkers in the morning, it is a mess in the evenings. But the gardens encircle some historic, art deco residences.

When to Reach

When to Reach

The best time to visit Mumbai is from October to February when the weather is pleasant and ideal for exploring and sightseeing. The temperature during this time ranges from 10 to 35 degrees Celsius. Mumbai receives copious rainfall during the monsoon from June to September. The temperature ranges from 20 to 30 degrees Celsius. Monsoon is the ideal time to visit Mumbai for taking a trek on the surrounding hills, because they look their greenest, with amazing waterfalls gushing down. Summer is not a good time to visit Mumbai because it is too hot and humid with temperatures between 25 to 38 degrees Celsius. One can also visit during:

  • Mumbai Festival(Jan) Sample the vibrant culture of the city. The festival covers theater, sports, fashion, food, and shopping.
  • Banganga Festival(Jan) the musical festival is organized by Maharashtra Tourism (MTDC) annually at Banganga Tank on Malabar Hill.
  • Elephanta Festival(March) Organized by Maharashtra Tourism, the festival of music and dance at Elephanta Caves has in the past festivals have seen performances by renowned artists like Alarmel Valli, Sanjeev Abhyankar, and Ananda Shankar and traditional Koli dances as well as traditional food. 7PM-10PM (Ferries start at 4PM), Rs 300 per day (includes to and from journey by ferry from Gateway of India to Elephanta Island)
  • Mumbai Wine Fest(Feb) Wine connoisseurs across the city gather to sample wines, enjoy the culinary delights while soaking in the cultural extravaganza put up at Kala Ghoda.

Why Should Go?

Why should I go?

Mumbai, previously known as Bombay is one of the most populous and biggest cities of Maharashtra. Also the biggest metropolis of this state, Mumbai is also popular as the entertainment and financial capital. It is the largest city of India and fondly called as the city of dreams. It is a place filled with dreamers and people who work hard day and night to achieve their dreams. From struggling actors, laboureres, Bollywood stars to gangsters, Mumbai has a lot. A lot that can be written about and talked about! Mumbai is also home to one of the biggest slum area as well as home to the richest and thus it is only fair to describe Mumbai as a city for all. The majorsly spoken language is definitely Hindi , but this city has welcomed people from all faiths and religion warmly. If you want to know and experience diversity, visit Mumbai. This city also has its very own language that is the Bambaiiya Hindi. Known to be a city filled with warm and friendly people, we believe that anything written about Mumbai is never enough.

The heart of Mumbai has some of the best and beautiful colonial architecture and if you venture out to the lesser known lanes, you will also come across several distinct bazaars, temples, fancy restaurants and a nightlife that is one of its kinds. Before Mumbai became the city hat it is now, it was a collection of seven islands which was eventually formed to form Bombay. It was given to the British as dowry to Charles II who married Catherine of Braganza. The island city that Mumbai is today is owing to these reclamation and these islands were home to several fishing colonies.

There are several attractions in Mumbai that will leave you awe struck. A walk around the streets of Colaba or near Churchgate is enough for you get a glimpse of the colonial era buildings. Some of the many monuments that give Mumbai a British look and feel are Chattrapati Shivaji Terminus, flora Fountain, High Court, Taj Hotel, Gateway of India and also the Asiatic Society. These are just some of the many attractions that this city of dreams has. Mumbai is the most cosmopolitan city in India. In comparison with the rest of the country, the city is quite liberal. With a regular influx of immigrants from rest of India, the citizens, popularly known as ‘Mumbaikers’, have shown remarkable tolerance towards other cultures, making it a true cultural melting pot.

Mumbai is a compact mix of traditional and modern. A lively and varied place, this waterfront city boasts a vibrant and cosmopolitan identity. Few cities in the world leave visitors with such vivid impressions, whether it’s the glitz and glamour of ‘Bollywood’, the spectacular array of Victorian buildings, the seaside rendezvous on Juhu Beach, or the maze of alleyways and streets of Mumbai.

The dining experience at an upscale restaurant in Mumbai is more or less the same as anywhere else in the world. If you search hard enough, you will find cuisine from practically every part of the world represented in the city. But to get a real flavour of what’s unique to Mumbai, you will have to go a little lower down the scale and experience the street food and Irani cafes. That is what is described here. For individual restaurants and other places to eat, go to the individual district pages.

Getting Around

Getting Around:

There are lots of transportation options. Bus, Train, Taxi, Car Rental for Mumbai sightseeing. You can choose any of them as per your need. You can explore the city easily and make your trip successful, also get plenty of time to do the rest of the things.

Taxis are cheap and plentiful ($15-18 should be enough to take you from one end of the city to the other). Most taxis in Mumbai are small-medium sized cars (non air-conditioned), painted black-and-yellow (black on lower body and yellow on roof). You can hail a cab off the streets. Mumbai’s famous but rickety and outdated Premier cabs, commonly referred to as Fiat taxis, have since been replaced by small but efficient Hyundai Santro and Suzuki Altos, with electronic meters. Also, according to law, a black-and-yellow taxi driver cannot refuse a fare.

However, if you want a comfortable, air-conditioned ride at a small surcharge of 25 percent over normal taxis it’s best to travel by branded cab services that operate at government-approved tariffs. These services operate modern fleets with well trained drivers. You can get them at 30-60 minutes notice, they are clean, air-conditioned, equipped with digital, tamper-proof meters, punctual, honest, and GPS-equipped-monitored, which makes them far secure at any time.

There are more than 200,000 Auto-rickshaws or the three wheeler Tuk Tuks running on Mumbai roads. They are only allowed to operate beyond Bandra in the western suburbs and beyond Sion in the central suburbs. They are not issued licenses in the downtown areas.

Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport (known as BEST) provides efficient and comprehensive services connecting up all places of the city and the suburbs. Some services also link the city with the extended suburbs like Navi Mumbai, Thane, and Mira-Bhayanadar areas. Seats are almost always occupied. There are bus stops all over the city. There is usually a crowd and queue. You have to get in through the rear entrance and off at the front. Tickets are issued by a uniformed “conductor” after you get in. Special seats are marked for “Ladies”, “Senior Citizens”, “Handicapped”, “Expectant Women”, and “Women with infants”. They can get in from the front.

Most people travel in Mumbai using the Suburban Rail Network commonly referred to as “Locals”. Mumbai has an extensive network, with three lines — the Western Line, the Central Main Line, and the Harbour Line.

Mumbai, though very well served by a suburban rail network, is a late comer to the Metro Rail Transit system. Till now it only has one 14 kms long East-West line in operation since June 2014 connecting the Central Line suburb of Ghatkopar with Versova in the West.

There are a few intra-city ferry services: Gateway of India to Elephanta caves Fast boats and Catamarans operated by private operators. These are moderately priced. This is the only way to get to Elephanta Caves. Marve Jetty (Malad) to Manori Jetty Cheap ferry connecting Manori and Gorai. Also services for Esselworld (Amusement Park). Versova (Andheri) to Madh Jetty Cheap ferry connecting Madh/Erangal/Aksa/Marve. Gorai (Borivali) to Gorai Beach Low cost ferry connecting Gorai Beach/Esselworld.

Weather

Weather:

Mumbai has a tropical climate, specifically a tropical wet and dry climate (Aw) under the Köppen climate classification. It varies between a dry period extending from October to May and a wet period peaking in June. The cooler season from December to February is followed by the hotter season from March to May. The period from June to about the end of September constitutes the south west monsoon season, and October and November form the post-monsoon season.

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