shorter essay. She is very significant person in my life. https://www.reddit.com/r/CertifiedWriters/comments/s9vwpt/paperell_review/ (or graduated) Significant University Pupils (or GED equal). Significant Faculty

Tourist Attractions in Hyderabad

Attractions

Overview

Hyderabad is the capital and largest city of the Indian state of Telangana and the de jure capital of Andhra Pradesh. It occupies 650 km (250 sq mi) on the Deccan Plateau along the banks of the Musi River, in the northern part of South India.

Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah established Hyderabad in 1591 to extend the capital beyond the fortified Golconda. In 1687, the city was annexed by the Mughals. In 1724, Mughal Viceroy Nizam Asaf Jah I declared his sovereignty and founded the Asaf Jahi dynasty, also known as the Nizams. Hyderabad served as the imperial capital of the Asaf Jahis from 1769 to 1948. As capital of the princely state of Hyderabad, the city housed the British Residency and cantonment until Indian independence in 1947.

Hyderabad is the capital of Telangana in Southern India, located on the banks of the Musi River and on the Deccan Plateau. Hyderabad and Secunderabad are “twin cities” near Hussain Sagar Lake (also known as Tank Bund in local parlance) but both cities have grown so much that now they have become one big metropolis. The city and district of Hyderabad are coterminous. Hyderabad district is entirely contained within the Ranga Reddy district of Telangana. Many of the suburbs of Hyderabad were recently merged into the city, now called Greater Hyderabad.

A city rich with history and tradition, Hyderabad now competes with Bangalore and Chennai for the crown of India’s IT capital; Microsoft, Amazon and Google have their India headquarters here.

Place to Visit

Places to Visit:

Old city is the historical region of Hyderabad. Most of the historical attractions are situated in the old city.

  • Charminar. Literally “Four minarets”, this structure was built at the very spot at which Quli Qutb Shah prayed for the end to the plague epidemic. The Charminar has long been the icon of Hyderabad. The towers rise to a height of 48.7 m above the ground. It has 140 steps. Graffiti on the walls have diminished the beauty of the Charminar. There is a mosque with 45 prayer spaces located inside in the upper storeys. The structure stands in the middle of a busy road with vehicular traffic, but a pedestrianization project is under way. Atop the minarets, you get a panoramic view of Hyderabad city. At the very bottom of one of the minar is a Hindu temple. The traffic is less than ideal.
  • Mecca Masjid, (SW of the Char Minar). Mecca Masjid is one of the oldest mosques in the city and easily the biggest. Muhammed Quli Qutub Shah began building it in 1617 under the supervision of Mir Faizullah Baig and Rangiah Choudhary. Mughal emperor Aurangzeb completed the construction in 1694. The mosque is a granite giant with awe-inspiring innards. The main hall of the mosque is 75 feet high, 220 feet wide and 180 feet long, big enough to accommodate ten thousand worshipers at a time. It is believed that Muhammed Quli commissioned bricks to be made with the soil brought from Mecca and inducted them into the construction of the central arch of the mosque, which explains the name of the mosque. It is mandatory for women to have a dupatta / shawl in order to be granted entry into the premises.
  • Chowmahalla Palace,  closed on National Holidays. Situated near Charminar, it was the seat of the Asaf Jahi dynasty where the Nizam entertained his official guests and royal visitors.
  • Falaknuma Palace. Built by Nawab Viqar al-Umra in 1872, Falaknuma is a stunning piece of architecture and the most opulent of the Nizam’s palaces. The interior is particularly impressive and features the works of Florentine sculptors and a 100-seater Dining Table. The palace has been converted into a hotel run by the Taj group and is no longer accessible to general public.
  • Golconda Fort.  The Golconda Fort was the capital of the Qutb Shahi kingdom. Set aside a minimum of 2 hr to do justice to your visit — the outer wall measures 10 km. Learning a little about the fort ahead of time is recommended as it is easy to get confused or lost in the massive space. If you accept one of the local guides – who hustle you at the entrance gate – try to pick one who actually knows his stuff rather than someone who was actually just passing by, spotted you and will tell you bits he once read in a guidebook. The genuine old Muslim guide who gained his encyclopedic knowledge of Golconda as an infant from his 118 year old grandmother knows the history of every inch of the place and will show you with expertise the echo/architecture system built into the fort that the ruler used as a communication/spying system. There is also a light and sound show- the story of Golkonda – for an hour, which could be a little boring, after sunset lasting ~1h that tells you the story of the fort and is worth seeing. The English show runs Nov-Feb 6:30PM daily and Mar-Oct until 7PM daily. Hindi and Telugu shows are run afterwards in certain days. Afterwards, have a wander through the tiny streets and shops surrounding the fort. The beautiful scruffy old shops and houses will sell you everything from naan bread to bangles, and the fading and gaudy old painted gates and houses are a delight, as are the friendly locals.
  • Qutb Shahi Tombs(1 km north of Golconda fort, approached via Banjara Darwaza).The Qutubshahi mosques in Hyderabad are so named because they were built by the Qutubshahi dynasty. Most of them were built by Quli Qutb Shah, the founder. Sadly in May 2010 local newspapers revealed that shoddy ‘restoration’ work allegedly using unskilled labour with road drills (bought in by one government department that didn’t bother to seek professional advice or inform the local archaeological or environment departments) has been damaging these beautiful buildings.
  • Qutub Shahi Tombs Site Museum, Hyderabad
  • E.H The Nizam’s Museum, Purani Haveli, Hyderabad-2(Behind Princess Durru Shehvar Children’s Hospital) Home to the famous wardrobe of Mahbub Ali Pasha, who is said never to have worn the same thing twice. It is the world’s longest wardrobe, built in two levels with a hand-cranked wooden lift(elevator) in place. This occupies the entire length of one wing of the palace. Hard to find, take small road next to Princess Durru Shehwar Hospital.
  • Hussain Shah Wali Dargah.
  • Moula Ali Dargah. 400 stairs brings you to a place of worship built by the Asif Jahis. The Moula Ali Dargah was built in the memory of Hazrat Ali, the son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad. Legend has it that Yakoob, a eunuch in the court of Ibrahim Quli, went to the hill after he saw Hazrat Ali seated on it. To his surprise, he saw the impression of Ali’s palm on a stone, which he had dreamt. He had the impression cut out and installed in a shrine. Ibrahim Shah later built a mosque beside the dargah. A Ashurkhana , a Baradari (pavilion) and an Nqqar khana (place for beating drums) were built during the Qutb Shahi period.
  • Osmania Arts College. Built during the period of the last Nizam, Mir Osman Ali Khan. The imposing facade of the building is a great sight.
  • Paigah Tombs, Santoshnagar (Pisal Banda).  These tombs belong to the ‘Paigah’ nobles (tied by blood and marriage to the Nizams) and are about 200 years old. These unique lime and mortar tombs are beautifully carved and have marble inlay work on them. Relaxing environment with bird singing.
  • Purani Haveli, Dewandevdi(SE of Afzalganj Bridge). Originally, the palace of the Nizam’s Prime Minister, later it was renovated and became the quarters of the Nizam’s son. It is a U-shaped complex with a single-storeyed building in the European style.
  • Raymond Tomb, Dilsukh Nagar, Asmaan Gadh. Michel Raymond, a French mercenary, was a military commander in the service of the second Nizam and also his close friend. His tomb is located at Saroornagar, and is made of black granite with beautiful sky view of the area
  • Salar Jung Museum, Naya Pul, Afzalgunj, ticketing closes at 4:15PM. This collection belonged to the Salar Jungs, Prime Minsters of Hyderabad, but has been augmented since. The collection includes articles mostly from medieval and modern times, with a concentration of articles from the Islamic era. The western wing on the second floor is interesting. It contains paintings, furniture and other objects that the Salar Jung got from the West. The collection of Nizam jewellery is displayed only on special occasions. It is one of the best private collections and museums in India. Free guided tours lasting two hours each are available at scheduled times, four times a day. Inquire at the entrance. Cameras, bags and liquids are not allowed, but mobile cameras are winked at. Deposit your contraband at the free lockers available near the ticketing area.

Toli Masjid, Karwan. 300 years old. Known for its splendid architecture.

When to Reach

When to Reach

While planning a trip to Hyderabad, make sure to keep the weather conditions in mind. Late summers in Hyderabad begin from May and last until July. Try to avoid these months since Hyderabad is scorching and humid in Summer. The months between August and October bring in moderate to heavy rainfall, and even though the weather is quite pleasant, you may be on the receiving side of some heavy downpour, thus bringing an end to the outdoor activities. Winters in Hyderabad, which start from November and last till February, are the best time to plan your trip to this place. Characterised by a cold climate, it is ideal for sightseeing and city shopping. Hence, Hyderabad is best visited from October to March.

Why Should Go?

Why should I go?

A city of contrasts, Hyderabad exudes an old-world charm of its own with the Old City (Charminar side), Hitech City (Cyberabad) and the other areas lying between the old and the new. The capital and the largest city of Telanaga, Hyderabad is home to stately mosques and noisy bazaars lined parallelly alongside swanky new office buildings and malls, and it is these very contrasts – these glimpses into the city’s rich past with inherent promises of an even better future –that make Hyderabad a city worth visiting. Maybe even more than once.

The city of pearls and biryani, Hyderabad is home to one of the most iconic landmarks – the Charminar. Translating to ‘four minarets’, the grand edifice is built entirely out of limestone and granite, with four minarets on four sides, each of them facing a different street. The Charminar stands in a labyrinth of lanes crammed with shops, markets, stalls and shoppers – one of the best places to shop for the authentic pearls and relish the tasty biryanis, skewer kebabs and haleem (the smorgasbord of food that Hyderabad is known for).
The other side of Hyderabad – HiTech City or Cyberabad – is a stark contrast to the Old City. The area teems with grand malls, pulsating clubs, sleek restaurants and hi-rise buildings of the every-growing multinationals. Between the old and new lie the popular city areas of Banjara Hills and Jubilee Hills flanked on the northeast by Secunderabad. Hyderabad and Secunderabad together are still referred to as the “twin cities”, though they are practically one now.

Hyderabad pulsates with a spectacular mix of people and traditions. Make a journey through this mind-stirring metropolis and be ready to be amazed, frustrated, confounded and thrilled, all at once!

Want a taste of being royal? Eat in Hyderabad, where culinary traditions have been passed down from the Nizam monarchy. Arabic, Turkish and Mughlai influences are easily recognisable. The city is famous for its rich, aromatic biryani made with lamb, chicken or vegetables and served with fragrant basmati rice. Satisfy your sweet tooth with double-ka-meetha, a bread pudding.

No visit to Hyderabad would be complete without sampling its unique cuisine – a rich blend of royal Mughlai flavours, Nizams special, and spice-up culinary traditions of South India such as: Hyderabadi biryani, pathar-ka-ghosht, nahari, haleem, double-ka-meetha, khubani-ka-meetha, seviyon-ka-meetha and kheer.

A popular dish of Hyderabad is biryani. Ask anybody about their favorite dish of Hyderabad, and they will definitely tell you Hyderabadi biryani. It is prepared with a blending of Mughal kitchen and the style of cooking practiced by the Nizams. Hyderabadi biryani has a distinct aroma. Beautifully garnished with pudina, fried onion & boiled eggs. Mostly it is served with dahi-ki-chutney and mirchi-ka-salan. Biryani has many variants like mutton biryani, chicken biryani, biryani khaam, biryani zard or zafrani or the most exotic of all joban malti biryani in which mutton, partridges and quails were cooked with rice.

Getting Around

Getting Around:

There are many ways to get around in Hyderabad. It has good metro and bus service, good autorickshaw service (although they never charge by meter and always overprice, making cabs cheaper) and well-developed Radio taxi services as well as new app-based services such as Uber and Ola. There is a local train service too, but it is grossly inadequate and unreliable. It is advisable that travelers using smartphones download the Hyderabad Police and Hyderabad Traffic Police apps from the app store, as these have some safety features such as an SOS button to the control room, as well as options to lodge complaints.

Hyderabad has good local bus connectivity and is run by TSRTC, a state-government owned corporation. Most intercity buses start and end at the Mahatma Gandhi Bus Terminus more commonly known as Imlibun, and there are numerous depots where city service buses start and end. One can use Google maps to plan travel by bus. There are five categories of buses (Ordinary, Metro Express, Metro Deluxe, AC, Volvo AC).

Autorickshaws in Hyderabad should be metered, though it can be difficult for non-locals and locals alike to find an autorickshaw driver who ever agrees to a metered fare. (This is especially true when hailing an auto in front of a 5-star hotel, near bus stands, railway stations and near Hi-Tech area.) However, Traffic police are very helpful and will help engage an Auto with metered fare. Autos can carry a maximum of 3 passengers excluding the driver, but it is common to find them being overloaded to carry up to six passengers when one.

Best to use new app based cabs such as Ola and Uber, which assure service and courteous drivers. However, there have been cases of misbehavior by drivers (although few) and it is advised to use the Hyderabad Police app and enter the details of the cab you are getting into, to be safe. Fares for these start at Rs. 6 per km and Rs. 1 per minute of ride time. (Ola Micro). Availability is very good at busy locales, and most apps have tracking features as well as SOS features. Metered Radio taxis are available, but they cannot be hailed off the street. One needs to call their centralized call center and book the service.

Local trains called MMTS are available, albeit only for a few places Places in Hyderabad, The frequency ranges from 10 to 30 minutes, except during day time and Sundays, when there are fewer trains. It is a fast way of travel to the few stations it covers, and the cheapest option as well.

The metro is a good choice when the network covers your desired route: It’s air conditioned, clean, not smelling, offers a high perceived security standard, is less densely crowded than autos and busses, slightly cheaper than autos, is reliable in terms of not being affected by traffic jams as well as due to the new, modern hardware. The trains move at 50-75km/h while road-bound vehicles can usually not go faster than 25-50km/h at daytime.

Weather

Weather:

Hyderabad has a tropical wet and dry climate (Köppen Aw) bordering on a hot semi-arid climate (Köppen BSh). The annual mean temperature is 26.6 °C (79.9 °F); monthly mean temperatures are 21–33 °C (70–91 °F). Summers (March–June) are hot and humid, with average highs in the mid-to-high 30s Celsius. Maximum temperatures often exceed 40 °C (104 °F) between April and June. The coolest temperatures occur in December and January, when the lowest temperature occasionally dips to 10 °C (50 °F). Heavy rain from the south-west summer monsoon falls between June and October, supplying Hyderabad with most of its mean annual rainfall.